Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Favorites from Bulgaria

I love these 2 cards sent by Lilia "childish". Both were in my favorites album and i'm really happy to have them now.

Shipka is a town in central Bulgaria, part of Kazanlak municipality, Stara Zagora Province. Local sights include the Russian-style Shipka Memorial Church also known as The Memorial Temple of the Birth of Christ or Shipka Monastery.
This is a Bulgarian Orthodox church built between 1885 and 1902 to Antoniy Tomishko's design in the seventeenth-century Muscovite style, under the direction of architect Alexander Pomerantsev. It is, together with the other parts of the Shipka Monument complex, dedicated to the Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian soldiers that died for the liberation of Bulgaria in the Russo-Turkish War, 1877-78.
The temple was officially opened on 28 September 1902 in the presence of Russian Army generals and many honourable guests. The opening and consecration of the Shipka Memorial Church coincided with the 25-year anniversary of the Battles of Shipka Pass. In 1970, the temple was proclaimed a national monument of culture.
The church's bell tower reaches a height of 53 m and its bells, the heaviest of which weighs 12 tons, were cast from the cartridges that were collected after the battles. In the temple itself, the names of the Russian regiments and Bulgarian volunteers are inscribed on 34 marble plates. The remains of the perished are laid in 17 stone sarcophagi in the church's crypt. - in:

Photo by Boyko Kalev
The Dyavolski most, "Devil's Bridge", is an arch bridge over the Arda River situated in a narrow gorge. It is located 10 km (6.2 mi) from the Bulgarian town of Ardino in the Rhodope Mountains and is part of the ancient road connecting the lowlands of Thrace with the north Aegean Sea coast.
It is not certain when the Dyavolski most was built, with various sources stating from the 14th to the early 17th century. The bridge, the largest and best known of its kind in the Rhodopes, is 56 m (183.7 ft) long and has three arches, but also features holes with small semicircular arches to read water level. The Dyavolski most has a width of 3.5 m (11.5 ft) and its main arch is 11.50 m (37.7 ft) high. A stone parapet, 12 cm (4.7 in) in height, is preserved on the sides, and breakwaters are placed opposite the stream. - in:

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